Sacha Test Results

Case Study – Weight Loss with Intermittent Fasting

Case Study Using Bio-Impedance Testing and Intermittent Fasting to Find an Ideal and Individual Nutrition/Weight Loss Program for Clients

The featured image for this post shows the Bio-Impedance test results of a client I have worked with recently on weight loss.

Whilst I have worked with weight loss for over 15 years since I began clinical work, and have seen some wonderful results, the challenge for clients has always been not necessarily in losing weight (I have some great programs that achieve that extremely well), it is in keeping it off or continuing to lose weight (if necessary) once they assimilate back into their normal lives.

Simply put, (as I’ve said many times) we have created a mismatch between the bodies we inherited from our hunter-gatherer ancestors, and the culture we have created. So we do not eat the way ‘we are built to’ which makes us fat and sick, deprives us of energy, we sleep poorly and die from chronic, lifestyle preventable, illnesses.

I have been looking for a solution for this for many years – the ‘so-called’ ideal eating plan. And intermittent fasting plays a significant role in this. Whilst no culture in evolutionary history has ever been exposed to the high levels of sugar and carbohydrates we now consume, every culture in evolutionary history was forced to adapt to famine, and therefore, fasting.

Ironically, when I was introduced to fasting over 20 years ago by the fantastic Russian doctor (who I now work with and learn from in my Sth Melbourne clinic) as a part of my recovery from chronic fatigue syndrome, CFS, I was told by many in the medical and wider community that fasting was dangerous and irresponsible. Yet when I recovered completely not long afterwards, they were either lost for words or denied that I was even sick in the first place. Grrrr…

Back to intermittent fasting. I believe it provides the perfect counterfoil for the hiccups we encounter when trying to eat well and lean in the modern world – the odd freedom meal/junk food meal, night out with a few drinks, business lunch, craving for sweet/savoury etc. The challenge lies in finding the program that works for each individual, as a program might have you lose weight, but you end up losing more muscle and water (or as much as) than fat, which is counterproductive in the long term.

Enter bio-impedance testing – a simple and quick, yet based on extensive research done, an accurate and objective measurement of body composition (muscle, fat and water levels), cellular health, biological age, and inflammation/toxicity status.

By comparing the results from bio-impedance testing to previous tests we are able to determine over time, the ideal nutrition program for each individual that provides a counterfoil to the challenges of the modern world, yet it suits the individuals lifestyle so it is more likely to continue long term.

The body composition results of the client in the featured image show that he made positive, yet very slow progress for the first month whilst we were determining a program that suited, whereas his progress in the second month has been fantastic. He lost roughly 2.3kg of fat whilst only losing 0.7kg of muscle (ATM). And in that time he did very little exercise due to work commitments, so increasing his resistance training again will increase his muscle mass. So his fat:muscle ratio dropped significantly, and that is the key body composition indicator we are looking at as research has found it is the number one body marker that contributes to ageing. For example, the average westerner will halve in muscle mass and double in fat mass between the ages of 20-60. Not good!!

I won’t go into too many other factors from the test today for the sake of time, however in the period of testing his biological age went from 37 down to 32 and, more importantly, in the last month it dropped from 36 to 32. So his nutrition is helping him feel younger inside, and he has more energy, sleeps better, improved mental clarity and feels better about himself and food in general.

In addition, via the Mickel Therapy and breathing work I do, I have learned a great deal about techniques we can use, including balancing our lifestyle more effectively, to reduce the negative impact stress has on ideal nutrition and weight loss. As such, I work with these techniques and a client’s lifestyle to support the program. These play a huge role in contributing to the results similar to above I have started to see more regularly in clients over a more sustained time frame.

If you would like to lose weight or explore intermittent fasting and bio-impedance testing further for weight loss or optimal living and performance, contact me at tim@timaltman.com.au or call 0425 739 918. Or go to the booking calendar on this site. I am in Torquay on Monday and Fridays, South Melbourne on Tuesdays and Thursdays, and I offer consultations online via Skype or over he

 

 

 

 

Obesity

Research: Consuming more of daily caloric intake at dinner predisposes to obesity.

Consuming more of daily caloric intake at dinner predisposes to obesity. A 6-year population-based prospective cohort study.

Linked below is a study confirming the old adage “Breakfast like the king/queen, dinner like a pauper”.

Quoted here is the conclusion: “Consuming more of the daily energy intake at dinner is associated with an increased risk of obesity, metabolic syndrome, and non-alcohol fatty liver disease (NAFLD).”

Well, technically this study only suggests the second part – ‘dinner like a pauper’. Or, certainly not a king or queen.

However plenty of studies have found that those who make their breakfast (or first meal of the day) their most substantial meal, they eat better and less for the next 24 hours.

I certainly have found consistently with clients in clinic that eating substantially at breakfast and less at dinner is much better for regulating blood sugar levels, having even and consistent energy throughout the day, and definitely helps to stay lean or lose weight.

Most clients who come to see me often really understand what foods are good, and not good, however many of these people simply do not know how to put together their daily nutrition to get the most out of themselves. They may be eating organic foods, and consuming lots of ‘super-nutrients’ (I quietly hate that term), but so often they don’t regulate their blood sugar levels, so end up having sporadic energy levels and mental functioning, and can often battle to keep prevent weight gain.

If you feel you would like help in working out the best way to plan your daily nutrition, please email me at tim@timaltman.com.au or phone 0425 739 918.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25250617

Fruit

Research: Dietary Sugar from Fruit Enhances Mineral Balance

An interesting study (abstract Iinked) that compares the effect of dietary starch and fructose on mineral balance in humans.

http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/49/6/1290.abstract

I will quote the words of Josh Lamaro, Paleo Osteo  from a Facebook post of his on this this study:

“Did you know the ingestion of fructose can help the body retain magnesium, copper, calcium and other minerals? Glucose alone did not have this effect.
This is one of many reasons why carbohydrates that contain fructose (sugars, fruits, juice, honey, fruit vegetables) are superior to carbohydrates that contain only glucose (starchy grains.)
The war on sugar needs careful contextualisation.”

Definitely some food for thought ūüôā

And lends weight to the idea of eating a diet similar to that of our hunter gatherer ancestors – from whom we inherited the bodies in which we habitate. Sugars from fruits are safer than those from starchy grains. Makes sense…

Whilst fructose, is also in table sugar, agave syrup, molasses, fruit juice and honey, stepping back 40,000 years or so, most of these were not available, so we can use this study to compare the sugar we were ‘built’ to eat from fruit, to that we a majority of now from starch. As such, from the evolutionary perspective, it is no surprise that fructose sugars enhance mineral balances whereas sugars from starch (gains etc.) do not.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The No 1 Dietary Mistake Most People Make

Having asked thousands of clients their average daily diet, I have no doubt that there is one common dietary habit or requirement that most people fail to achieve. From my clinical experience, I would say that over 95% of people fail to achieve this Рregardless of whether they eat organic, are vegetarian or vegan or follow some other dietary or health approach. It is so predictable.

The answer?

That they fail to regulate their blood sugar levels on a day to day basis. The pattern that usually occurs to varying degrees is that people’s blood sugar levels fluctuate throughout the day with intermittent peaks and troughs – known as hypoglycaemia. The telltale signs of this are:

  • Desire for sweets or refined carbohydrates (processed or white flour, alcohol), or foods high in trans or saturated fats, at the times where we usually experience blood sugar level troughs – upon waking, mid morning, especially mid afternoon, pre-dinner, post dinner.
  • Fatigue at the times above or generalised fatigue.
  • Excessive hunger, especially at lunch or late afternoon and pre-dinner.
  • A need for coffee to get going at the start of the day¬† or regular consumption of coffee throughout the day – at times similar to the above (especially the first half of the day).
  • A propensity for weight gain.

Why do we get this wrong?

The answer could lie in understanding what our body has evolved or adapted to and comparing that to what we expose our bodies to in the modern world. It is understood from genetic and anthroplogical research that it takes 40,000 to 100,000 years for a change in our environment to be genetically assimilated by our bodies, meaning that the bodies we have inherited are those that adapted to the environment our hunter-gatherer or paleolithic ancestors were exposed to 40,000 years ago or more. Or, put more loosely, our bodies still think we are wandering the bush!!

Yet the environment our hunter-gatherer ancestors were exposed to was vastly different to the culture we have created. Our ancestors lived in an environment where food was scarce and we had to work hard to find it. We were often hungry and exposed to conditions of scarcity and famine. As such we evolved to be extremely adept at seeking out energy dense foods Рespecially when we were hungry. We all know the feeling that fatty or sweet foods smell or appear almost irresistible when we are hungry!

Two examples of energy dense foods include those high in carbohydrate (sugar) and those high in fat. Yet, there were very few of these energy dense foods available to our hunterer-gatherer ancestors – some via animal sources, or nuts and seeds and maybe fruit. Compare that to nowadays where energy dense foods are everywhere – in fact, most junk or packaged foods are comprised mostly of fat and/or refined carbohydrate/sugar. Food companies, which are invariably more interested in bottom line than they are in our health, prey on this aspect of our behaviour.

The changes in our food chain first began about 2,000 to 10,000 years ago with the advent of agriculture or farming – which is, at best, one quarter of the time it takes for a change to be adapted by our bodies. This saw the advent of grain and saw us start to settle in villages and towns. Evolutionary biologist, Dr Daniel Lieberman, who wrote the wonderful book “The Story of The Human Body”, suggests that while the advent of farming was great from an economic perspective as it made food more readily available, so our population could grow, it was the biggest mistake we ever made from an evolutionary perspective, because it resulted in the carbohydrate content of our food chain increasing dramatically which paved the way for hypoglycaemia.

With the advent of the industrial revolution and our modern technological age, this change accelerated exponentially. We now have far more exposure to carbohydrates, refined carbohydrates, sugars; and saturated and trans fats. And at levels that none of us have ever had a chance to adapt to. Hypoglycaemia is clearly a by-product of this evolutionary mis-match.

All of the eating programs and dietary plans that benefit our health and work in the long run, whether by design or not, successfully rectify this failure to regulate blood sugar levels.

To be continued…