Breathing Man meditating - breathing optimally...

How Would Optimal Breathing Feel to Your Body?

What Does Functional, or Optimal Breathing Look Like?

Normal breathing is defined as:

  • A silent, gentle wave pattern
  • 8-10 breaths per minute
  • Through the nose
  • Tongue resting at the roof of the mouth.
  • Driven via the diaphragm with minimal or no upper chest or shoulder movement
  • Yielding a tidal volume (volume of air in and out) of 4-5 litres per minute.

These diagnostic norms combined with the optimal concentration of CO2 in arterial blood of 40mmHg partial pressure (based on the previous discussion about the Bohr Effect), will ensure that the pH of the blood is maintained at its ideal levels (7.35-7.45), and result in optimal energy production in cells.

The respiratory centre(s) in the brain control breathing rate and depth and primarily use the concentration of CO2 in arterial blood (pACO2). pAO2 is also used in part (via receptors in the carotid arteries), but, as oxygen availability in cells is directly related to pACO2 (The Bohr Effect), CO2 concentrations remain the primary determinant.

A functional or normal breathing rate of 8-10 breaths combined with pACO2 of 40mmHg will allow for maintenance of pH in the ideal range of 7.35 to 7.45.

Therefore if pACO2 drops below 40mmHg, it follows that the breathing rate will have to increase to maintain this ideal pH range.

If the pACO2 remains below ideal for an extended period of time (as is the case with over-breathers or those with chronic breathing disorders such as asthma, snoring, hyperventilation etc), the brain will accept this as normal functioning and will adapt by establishing this elevated breathing rate as normal. So the respiratory centre(s) in the brain will now have a lower pACO2 as a ‘trigger point’ to re-instigate breathing via the diaphragm.

As mentioned earlier, the diagnostic norm of 8-10 breaths per minute translates to 12,000-14,000 breaths per day. Yet the average person breathes up to 30,000 times per day. This suggests that the average person breathes roughly twice as often as we are ‘designed’ to and, more seriously, that the average person does not meet diagnostic norms for breathing. And therefore, is not capable of breathing functionally or optimally due to habitual over-breathing patterns.

Indeed, our clinical experience has confirmed this. Using CapnoTrainer biofeedback technology, we have not found a single person, without previous training, capable of breathing at a level that is considered functional according to diagnostic norms. So we are all over breathers – both in rate and volume until we are trained to breathe functionally again.

Common sense, reinforced by research, suggests that performing a bodily function at a level that is considerably inferior to that which is found to be optimal (from an evolutionary perspective) will ultimately lead to a compromise in function, including pathology, elsewhere in the body.

For example, we all know that living with blood pressure that is significantly above or below what is the diagnostic norm for blood pressure (and, as such, the blood pressure our system was designed to function optimally at) will lead to serious side effects or pathology. Indeed, high blood pressure and low blood pressure are both medical conditions that are taken very seriously by the medical community.

Similarly, if insulin levels are constantly elevated compared to diagnostic norms (via elevated blood sugar levels), then diabetes can eventually be the result. Obviously, diabetes or hyper-insulinaemia are both treated as serious or chronic life threatening medical conditions that are in epidemic proportions in the Western world.

Yet, whilst it is common knowledge that most or all of us over-breathe compared to diagnostic norms, why is it that over breathing is not treated as a serious medical condition?

Perhaps because breathing is so central to our functioning at all levels of the body and in all systems of the body, the side effects of over breathing are not as obvious as they are with the above abnormalities in our physiology or biochemistry.

Understanding the problem requires an understanding of the current medical model and its origins.  The medical system which evolved to deal with the historically predominant threats of infection and trauma became a system which focuses its energy on acute treatment of distinct, specific diseases, seeking to eliminate a single causative agent, with the patient as a passive recipient of the ‘cure’.  We can see how this approach is out of alignment with the new wave of chronic disease.  Instead, these patients require long term management, of multiple, overlapping states of dysfunction, driven by numerous causative factors, with the patient being required to take the primary role in their own risk reduction.

The Breathing Dynamics program will retrain you to breathe at functional, or optimal levels. Your energy levels, sleep, performance, circulation, digestion, nervous system, and many other systems in the body will see the benefits of this….

Breathing is a function that is vital for life - yet most of us completely take i8t for granted, and don't even though that we breathe way below optimal levels...

BREATHING FOR LIFE – OR DEATH!!

Introduction to Breathing Dynamics – Why is Proper Breathing So Important

Breathing is the most central process of our functioning that we have direct conscious control over and the area where we can have the most influence regarding whole health.

Breathing is central to all life – we cannot live without it for more than a few minutes.

It is the one thing we do more than anything else – the average person breathes up to 30,000 times per day on average.

BUT did you know that:

  • The quality of your breathing affects the quality of your life?
  • And that most of us OVER-BREATHE – both in rate and depth? For example, diagnostic norms suggest that we should breathe 12-14,000 times per day rather than 30,000 times.
  • Do you know what it means to breathe OPTIMALLY?
  • The limiting factor in OPTIMAL RESPIRATION, and therefore OPTIMAL ENERGY FOR OUR CELLS, is not a lack of oxygen that we inhale? It is a lack of oxygen released into cells (due to low levels of carbon dioxide) caused by OVER-BREATHING OR DYSFUNCTIONAL BREATHING!!!!

So why do most of us take our breathing for granted?

Why do we accept less than optimal breathing function?

Perhaps, until now, we have not been aware of the link between dysfunctional breathing and symptoms of ill-health or disease. Some of these symptoms include:

 

Fatigue & Lethargy Digestive upsets – IBS, constipation, diarrhoea. Irritability Waking un-refreshed
Anxiety Allergies Shortness of breath Headaches/migraines
Depression & emotional disturbances Skin irritations – eczema etc. Breathing difficulties – asthma, wheezing. Sinusitis & excessive mucus production
High blood pressure Poor  concentration Night-time toilet trips Frequent colds & flus
Dental problems &/or deformities Memory loss Poor sleep or leep disturbances Muscular or nerve chest & pains

Also, very few of us are aware that we could make significant changes to our health, stability, posture, attention, composure and sleep quality by learning how to breathe functionally. In addition to reversing the symptoms of ill-health or disease mentioned above, some more of these changes include:

 

Enhanced energy levels Greater endurance & stamina Improved focus & concentration
Improved immune system function Improved blood flow to extremities Improved responsiveness to stressors
Better posture & stability Delayed lactic acid onset during exercise Greater access to “Zone” states during exercise/performance
More relaxed muscles/joints Better focus & concentration Enhanced happiness/self image
Improved flexibility Improved mood stability Lower heart rates

 

Breathing Dynamics aims to restore optimal or functional breathing and therefore maximise delivery of oxygen to cells (for energy) by offering a variety of understandings and techniques that encourage:

 

  1. Breathing through the nose at all times.
  2. Using the diaphragm as the principal or primary muscle for breathing.
  3. Regulating breathing rate and volume.

 

We offer breathing retraining courses for individuals and groups, which usually run for 8-10 hours (broken up into a few sessions) plus ongoing evaluation. These courses have a strong practical focus. To facilitate learning, we use CapnoTrainer® biofeedback technology, which gives an individual information on their own functioning from their own body’s perspective rather than just relying on coaching or feedback from a another person. By the end of the course we give clients the knowledge and understanding, both theoretically and practically, for them to be able to breathe functionally or optimally in many of life’s varying circumstances.

We also offer online modules (purchased via the online shop) on breathing retraining to optimize function and facilitate healing for a number of ailments and purposes. These include:

  1. Asthma
  2. High blood pressure/hypertension
  3. Fatigue
  4. Anxiety/depression
  5. Snoring/sleep apnoea
  6. Eczema/skin conditions
  7. Stress management
  8. Allergies
  9. To facilitate dental corrections
  10. Enhanced sporting performance
  11. Enhanced work performance – artistic and business.
  12. Ability to hold the breath underwater (specific to surfers etc)
  13. Breathing for yogis.
Keys to maintaining constant energy levels throughout the day, and preventing illness.

Optimal Performance Nutrition for Feeling Awesome

Blood Sugar Regulation for Optimal Performance

Blood Sugar Regulation is aimed at regulating blood sugar levels to optimise energy production (and remove slumps in energy levels – such as mid afternoon).

Most of us over-consume or eat mostly carbohydrate rich foods, which the body converts into high levels of glucose for energy production in the cells. It is estimated that the average Westerner consumes at least 50% more carbohydrates daily than our hunter gatherer ancestors. In response to a higher carbohydrate intake, the pancreas produces high levels of insulin, which is used to transport this glucose to the cells for energy production.

Excessive production of insulin is termed hyperinsulinaemia, and prolonged hyperinsulinaemia can result in the cells becoming insulin resistant. The cells do this to prevent more energy being produced than our body demands at the time. What this means over time however, is that the cells, having become conditioned to being resistant to insulin, can no longer get the glucose they need for energy.
The cells of the body make up all of the systems within the body. If these cells cannot produce enough energy to function properly, then the systems begin to break down leading to the indicators of lack of health mentioned earlier. And, ultimately to more the deep seated, chronic pathological conditions.

In addition, insulin resistance is a process that is inflammatory in nature. It is no surprise also, the the chronic illnesses that we most commonly suffer from, and that account for 90% of deaths in the Western World, are inflammatory conditions.
Unfortunately, as is very often the case, if the input of fuel for energy outweighs the demand for energy, then this glucose floating around in the blood stream must be stored. Apart from the small amounts of glucose that can be stored in the liver and skeletal muscles as glycogen, the main storage mechanism of this fuel involves converting the glucose to fat and storing it wherever this fat may be deposited (and most of us are aware of these areas in our own bodies).

What compounds this even further, is that insulin is a storage hormone, and elevated levels of insulin, or hyperinsulinaemia, prevents the release of this converted glucose from the fat stores when it is required. Fat is the most efficient source of fuel for energy in our bodies (in terms of amount of energy produced per gram), and when the cells can no longer gain access to this extremely efficient fuel source, apart from the circulating glucose in our blood or glycogen stores in the liver and muscles which are very limited, the body must access our protein stores for energy. Our protein stores include our muscles and vital organs. Not ideal.

Extensive scientific research has shown that the number one biological marker in the body of ageing is a reduction in our muscle mass to fat ratio. And this marker adversely affects all other biological markers of ageing; such as basal metabolic rate, heart rate, blood pressure, cholesterol levels, HDL (good fat) to VLDL (bad fat) ratio, bone density, blood sugar tolerance, aerobic capacity etc.
So, in addition to our systems not producing energy efficiently and adequately, and potentially leading us down the path to obesity, we are also accelerating our own ageing process. This all leads to a poor quality of life in comparison to what is available to us all if we are prepared to open up to our genetic potential.

If you are lean it does not mean however, that your cells are not insulin resistant. It just means that you are burning all of your circulating glucose for fuel before it gets deposited in the fat cells. The excessive levels of carbohydrates and resultant insulin resistance will still cause the body to function less efficiently as it will not produce the energy required at the rate that it is demanded, as it can’t get access to the fuel quickly enough. And body will also be inflammatory.

The “Optimal Performance Nutrition” program is based on predominantly eating foods that our hunter gatherer ancestors ate, as, from a genetic perspective, our body still functions as if we were still wandering the bush. These foods are generally low glycaemic load (GL) foods. The GL is the ranking of foods based on their immediate effect on blood glucose (blood sugar) levels and the amount of sugar they contain. The lower the GL, the lower the sugar content, and the better the food is for you.

Some of the benefits of a low GL diet:
• Improved energy levels.
• Maintenance of healthy cardiovascular function.
• Weight/fat loss.
• Low GL foods keep you feeling fuller for longer.

It was once thought that table sugar and particularly sugary foods such as sweets were the only foods that had to be avoided by people trying to control their blood sugar. However, the GL has shown us that complex carbohydrates such as potatoes, and particularly refined grains such as white flour (bread, pasta, cakes, biscuits, many cereals etc. etc.) and white rice can have an effect that is comparable to eating table sugar. And our hunter gatherer ancestors did not have access to these foods either.

One of the reasons for this is that refined grains have the fibrous, outer (often brown) shell removed. This outer shell, or husk, contains a lot of fibre which slows down the entry of the sugar into the blood stream. Fibre is also very important in maintaining the motility of our digestive system, and keeping our bowel movements regular. Given that up to 70% of our immune cells line our digestive tract, it is far more healthy to have an efficient, regularly moving digestive system than one that is blocked, irritated and festering!!!!

In addition, the husk also contains most of the micronutrients (vitamins and minerals) in the grain. These micronutrients are essential in so many of the chemical reactions and processes that occur in the body. If these vitamins and minerals are absent in the food we consume, then the body will take them from its own stores.

An example of this is Calcium. The main stores of calcium in the body are in the bones and muscles. Calcium is essential in firing many of the chemical reactions in the body, including the production of energy in the cells. If Calcium is deficient in the food we eat, then the body will remove it from the bone and muscle stores. Maybe this may go a long way towards explaining why in the Western World, whilst we are the largest consumers of dairy (which are high in Calcium), we also experience the far higher rates of osteoporosis in comparison to countries where the population eat predominantly whole foods, and are far more active. Is it possible that because we eat such extraordinary amounts of refined carbohydrates, that our bodies end up leeching our bones of major minerals such as Calcium or Magnesium to perform their functions?
So, essentially, when consuming refined grains, you are eating nothing more than empty, sugary calories (see Table 2 – Pasta & Sugar Equivalents).

In addition to low GL foods, the Optimal Performance Nutrition program may require you to modify your protein intake. More specifically, to have small amounts of protein regularly. This is because you may not have been eating enough protein at certain times of the day, and too much at other times. A healthy protein intake improves appetite control, increases metabolism and helps maintain lean muscle mass. It is important to note that this does not imply or suggest a high protein diet – just a small to moderate amount regularly.

On the Optimal Performance Nutrition program you will also need to ensure you consume adequate amounts of “good” fats, known as ‘essential fatty acids’. Whilst saturated fats and trans fats (a thickener found in margarine, spreads, biscuits etc.) are very bad for you, certain fats and polyunsaturated fatty acids are very good for us and have important health benefits. Fats from oily fish, nuts, seeds, and healthy oils such as extra virgin olive oil anti-inflammatory and immune stimulating. They improve a wide range of conditions and may even help improve your mood and skin.

To gain optimal performance from your nutritional program, certain basic guidelines need to be observed.

In this program Tim will assess your current daily food intake and offer solutions to optimise your health and energy production by providing a plan which focuses on your body’s needs.

Follow up consultations will continue to assess your performance and energy levels while building a solid foundation for a healthier, happier you.

Benefits of Sauna Therapy

Benefits of Sauna Therapy

Sauna Therapy and Pine Needle Oil research:

The skin is the body’s largest organ and our interface with the physical world. Through perspiration, it acts as an important vehicle for the elimination of toxins. The skin is often referred to as the ‘third kidney’.

Saunas assist greatly in the elimination of toxins. In the process the skin is cleaned of surface bacteria and dead skin cells – something that cannot be done by just taking a shower or bath. The sauna also cleans the capillaries, resulting in vastly improved skin condition.

Saunas have been used for thousands of years by Scandinavians, Russians, North American Indians and many others.

In Russia and Finland, there is a saying that every day you take a sauna is a day that you are not ageing.

Hippocrates, the founder of Western medicine more than two thousand years ago, said: “Give me the power to create a fever, and I shall cure any disease”.

Although misunderstood as a symptom of disease, fever is actually a part of the body’s natural healing response. During a fever, the functioning of the immune system is stimulated, whilst growth of bacteria and viruses are inhibited. All of us would be aware of the great feeling of cleanliness and well being experienced after a fever has passed through us. Saunas elicit similar responses and are often called ‘artificial fevers’.

Extensive research over many years has shown numerous benefits of saunas, including increased circulation, detoxification and oxygenation of tissues and cells, stimulation of the immune system, reduction of stomach acidity, reduction of cold/flu symptoms, increased lung capacity, relaxation, enhanced quality of sleep and reduced soreness post exercise/injury.

Research has supported the use of saunas for treatment of pain management (including arthritis, fibromyalgia, sports injuries etc), in detoxification programs, weight loss, lowering of blood pressure and stress relief.

Russian and Finnish research has shown the sauna to be an irreplaceable training modality for athletes, reducing recovery time and soreness post exercise/injury, and increasing muscle power and concentration. It also reduces the cold, nervous feeling that causes shivering before competition and that can make athletes prone to injury.

The psychological impacts of the sauna have been shown to be just as significant. After a sauna, feelings of stress, lethargy and tiredness are replaced with a generalized feeling of well-being which includes lightness, energy, relaxation and optimism.

Prior to the late 1980 Olympics, forest biochemists in the former Soviet union developed a pine needle oil derived from the non-water soluble fraction of the paste from Scotch Pine (Pinus sylvestris) and European Spruce (Picus abies) needles combined with the oil fraction isolated in Siberian Fir (Abies siberica) needle extraction. Their research found that it significantly enhanced the therapeutic benefits of sauna therapy including elimination of lactic acid and reduced recovery time and soreness post competition, training and injuries.

The oil is a natural complex containing many biologically active substances including vitamin E, carotenoids, phytosterols, terpenoids, polyprenols and pure conifer essential oil. It is rubbed on to the torso and any sore or injured areas during a sauna

Research in Russia found that the positive, therapeutic effects of saunas were significantly enhanced when used in conjunction with this oil based conifer needle extract.

This research compared those who used saunas alone with those who complement their sauna with the needle extract. Specifically it was found that far greater than using a sauna alone, using Pine needle oil in conjunction with a sauna:

  • Increased muscle concentration and power.
  • As a result it helps replace areas of dimply ‘cellulite’ skin with a toned, muscular look.
  • Increased sweating.
  • Improved detoxification and elimination of toxins, lactic acid and other metabolic wastes.
  • Improved detoxification and elimination of heavy metals.
  • Reduced soreness post exercise and injury, and speed up recovery time.
  • Activation the immune system and increased antimicrobial activity both in the skin and further internally.
  • Increasing adipose tissue in the skin, making the skin softer, more hydrated and younger looking.
  • Increase the skin’s resistance to irritants.
  • Leading to a generalized feeling of well being.
  • Promoting a great night’s sleep.
  • Assistance with recovery from jet lag.
bio-impedance-analysis

Bio-Impedance Analysis

VLA (Vitality, Longevity and Anti-Ageing) and Bio-Impedance Analysis

Biological age, Vitality, Longevity & Anti-Ageing incorporates a scientifically validated test known as Bio-Impedance Analysis (BIA). BIA is a science that was originally developed for the use in monitoring patients after surgery. It measures several biological markers (bio-markers) of health including muscle and fat mass, cellular health and energy production. Once you get a clearer picture of your health, we can create a program to improve those areas which are seen to be less healthy.

The bio-markers will give you an indication of your current state of health, providing information on:

  • Energy levels
  • Muscle mass/Body fat levels
  • Body fluid distribution
  • Toxicity
  • Inflammation
  • Cellular health
  • Response to treatment

VLA-Reports-1VLA-Reports-2

The main people who benefit from VLA are those who want to:

  • Improve performance (both physical and mental)
  • Improve their energy levels
  • Increase muscle tone and fitness
  • Lose body fat
  • Age healthily
  • Effectively detoxify their body

From a VLA analysis each client receives a computerised report (and/or history), individual health goals, specific lifestyle, dietary and supplemented recommendations and ongoing monitoring and progress.

For enquiries on natural medicines, naturopathy or to make an appointment for a naturopathic consultation contact Tim Altman via email or phone on 0425 739 918.

Nutrition for Health and Performance

A lovely testimonial, below, that shows that, with enthusiasm and persistence, anyone can achieve great health and performance outcomes via healthy eating.

“Hi Tim,
I’d like to drop a line to let you know how I am going with eating healthy food. So far, I am feeling great and noticed some progress with my health. I find that my swimming has improved from 1.8km to 3km in an hour. I have progress to second fastest lane group……..My motivation in doing things are great. My surgery has now been booked to remove cancer from my kidney…….Thanks for your outstanding consultation.
Jo alias “Smokin Jo”

If you are interested in feeling like you’re ‘smokin’, then contact me for a consultation.healthy-food

Hunter gatherer foods

The Ideal Nutrition Plan for The Modern World

The Nutrition Plan That Combines the Strengths and Counters the Weaknesses of The Paleo Diet and Intermittent Fasting

 

In the 15+ years I have been working with nutrition and natural health, I have done a lot of contemplating and experimenting with what might be the ideal overall diet for the modern world, that allows one to maintain ideal weight or lose weight, and keep the gut functioning at a healthy level, yet also be a social, interactive hum being at the same time.
The standard questions I have asked thousands of clients, are; “what is your average daily diet, as in everything you eat and drink in the day, and when?”; “when are you most likely to feel hungry during the day or crave sweet or savoury foods?”; and “when, if any time of the day’ do you feel most tired or flat energetically?”.

I noticed a very clear pattern in most people where they ate little or no breakfast, or their breakfast was insufficient in protein, and their snacks were non-existent, sporadic or full of sugar or refined carbohydrates. As a consequence, they were unable to regulate their blood sugar levels throughout the day with the usual flat or craving spots being mid-late afternoon and post dinner. The consequence of this is hypoglycaemia and insulin resistance, which results in a system that produces energy poorly, puts on weight more easily and is inflammatory, meaning that it promotes chronic illness.
On top of that, they often relied on caffeine to get them going and maintain energy levels throughout the day, which further exacerbates insulin resistance, and exhausts the nervous system and drains the adrenal glands over time.

The solution to the ideal diet seemed to lie in a plan that regulated blood sugar levels. To gain more insight into this, I started investigating the research coming out from anthropological, evolutionary biology and genetic sources, which suggests that the body we have inherited is that of our hunter gatherer ancestors from some 40,000 to 100,000 years ago. Meaning that we are ideally built to eat and drink the way our hunter gatherer ancestors did (not our cave man ancestors who existed many thousands of years prior to this).
Research has suggested that they ate only animal protein, vegetables, fruit, nuts and seeds, and we drank only water. That’s all they had access to.
In fact, grain only became available to humans when the agricultural revolution began around 2,000 to 10,000 years ago, and the grains we consume now, courtesy of the industrial and technological revolutions, have become vastly different to these ancient grains. Even so, according to this research mentioned above, 2-10,000 years is not long enough for our bodies to fully assimilate such foodstuff.
We are simply not built for a high intake of grain. And certainly not sugar which entered the food chain only a few hundred years ago.
Whilst the agricultural revolution was wonderful from an economic perspective as it allowed the population to increase exponentially (as we now had storable foods that lasted longer and we could move into villages), it was a catastrophe for our bodies as it increased the carbohydrate content in the food chain dramatically. And it got worse and worse, the more we advanced as a species.
This motivated the evolution of nutrition programs that reflect our ancient diet. The Paleo diet is the most well known, but it was by no means the first of this type of program. Elimination or detox diets, and controlled ketosis diets, had been in existence for well over a decade before the Paleo craze came in.
All of these programs are extremely effective when adhered to strictly – the common denominator being a small amount of protein regularly to regulate blood sugar levels, and lots of vegetables and some fruit. In essence, grains and dairy are replaced by vegetables. This makes sense, given that of all the research done on nutrition, the one unequivocal fact is that the more vegetables you eat, the better your immune system and the greater you chance of preventing chronic illness (which accounts for 90% of deaths in the modern world).
However, the one weakness of these programs is that they don’t allow for much deviation. You have to adhere to them quite strictly to see the benefits. Which is hard if you lead a healthy social life.
The question then beckons; ‘how do we compensate for this whilst living in the modern world?’
Enter intermittent fasting. I have practiced fasting for over 20 years (as it had been an integral part of my recovery from chronic fatigue syndrome – CFS), and have long known the benefits. Whilst therapeutic fasting had been extensively researched in the former Soviet Union, the research in the West has only started to wake up to its’ benefits.
It makes sense from an evolutionary biology perspective as we were often exposed to periods where food supply was scarce. Our body knows how to adapt.
It has been understood for some time that whilst calorific restriction has very positive health benefits, it is also very restrictive and not fun. However, a good deal of research has found that intermittent or occasional fasting can have great benefits to weight, the digestive system and in treating and preventing chronic illness. The BBC documentary by Dr Michael Mosley, and the evolution of the ‘Fast Diet’ or ‘The 5:2 Diet’ really made this understanding more mainstream.
This program can work spectacularly well, however it also has a weaknesses. The two (or three or one) fasting days per week are not a pure fast – it involves consuming about ¼ of the average calorific intake (500 calories for women and 600 for men) for 2 days per week, and eating ‘normally’ for the other 5 days. Herein lies the weakness. As discussed above, many or most peoples’ normal eating is far from ideal, as they fail to regulate blood sugar levels and eat far too many carbohydrates and saturated fats.
Whilst this program is effective for some as they do eat quite well during the 5 days of ‘normal’ eating, for a number of individuals this program can fail to create the desired effects.

The solution to this for me that would create the ideal eating plan that allows for weight loss or maintenance, a healthy gastro-intestinal system, a robust immune system, plenty of vitality and great sleep was to combine the strengths of the hunter-gatherer (or Paleo) programs that help to regulate blood sugar levels and reduce carbohydrate intake, with those of intermittent fasting programs, that can compensate for the odd deviation or freedom meal. The beauty of this is that each program counters the weakness of the other.

For example, eating in a way that regulates blood sugar levels will mean that when you are not on your fast days, your ‘normal’ eating will be more ideal, and the fast days allow you to have 2-3 freedom meals per week yet still maintain ideal health. This allows for a few drinks and a meal that does not entirely resemble that of our hunter gatherer ancestors when we are in social situations. In other words, we get to eat in a way that really explores optimal levels of health and well-being, yet be human at the same time.
Not a bad outcome. And it is really starting to work with clients. And compliance is far greater.

For details on this program, please contact me by emailing or phoning me at tim@timaltman.com.au or 0425 739 918.
This program can be followed by booking in for an appointment and regular check-ups, or monitoring it yourself from afar.

Sauna 2.7_Barrel_inside2_pond_blog

New Study: Sauna Extends Life Expectancy

To Extend Your Life, Spend Time In A Sauna

Linked is an article on a new study performed in Finland, following 2,315 Finnish men from 42 to 60 years of age over a 21 year period.

It turned out the more saunas the men took, the better their chances were for living longer.

More specifically, the men who had more than four sauna sessions per week had the lowest risk of death — 40% lower than those who went twice a week — but those who had two to three sessions still got some of the cardiovascular benefits.

I’m glad I get into the sauna regularly. Whilst previous research from Russia, Japan and Scandinavia, going back many years has already confirmed similar benefits, this certainly suggests there is a method to our madness.

And, even better, the sauna I use is a traditional Finnish sauna. Personally, I have always preferred the feeling of well-being I get following a traditional Finnish sauna over a far-infrared sauna.

http://www.mindbodygreen.com/0-17617/to-extend-your-life-spend-time-in-a-sauna.html

Breathing Dynamics at RACV Oct 2015

Breathing Dynamics Course for Surfers and Sports People

Breathing Dynamics Course for Surfers and Sporting Performance at One Lifestyle, RACV, Torquay. Starting Wednesday 14th October

I am excited to be offering an 8 week Breathing Dynamics course for surfers and sporting performance on a Wednesday evening at RACV Torquay resort.

Breathing has been described as the ‘last frontier’ of exploration of sporting performance.

Most people do not realise that they breathe at only 50-75% of their physiological and biological potential at best.

More and more research has started to come out suggesting that if we unlock this unused potential we can experience many benefits for sporting performance, including:

  1. Great use of full lung volume for gas exchange.
  2. Ability to operate at lower breathing and heart rates at higher levels of exercise.
  3. Greater efficiency of oxygen to cells for energy production.
  4. Ability to hold the breath for extended periods of time.
  5. Delayed lactic acid onset and greater buffering of lactic acid.
  6. More relaxation during exercise.
  7. Greater access to ‘zone’ states during sporting performance.
  8. Increased core stabilisation via diaphragm control.

The course will suit both water based (surfers, swimmers, paddlers etc.) and land based (cyclists, runners, football players, yogis etc.) as we will mix up activities.

Both members and non-members of One Lifestyle at RACV Torquay are welcome to participate.